Looking for some Year 11 Biology Module 2: Organisation of Living Things practice questions? You’ve come to the right place!

As Organisation of Living Things is a relatively new module part of the new Year 11 Biology syllabus, it can be a bit difficult to find practice questions for it.

Luckily for you, we’ve got 20 practice questions that cover all 4 inquiry questions in Year 11 Biology Module 2: Organisation of Living Things.

We’ve also got 3 top tips to follow when doing practice questions!

So, what are you waiting for? Jump into our Year 11 Biology Module 2 practice questions!

Practice Question Tips
Organisation of Cells
Nutrient and Gas Requirements 
Transport

Practice Question Tips

Know what the question is asking. Look at the key term. Does the question ask you to evaluate, explain or describe? To properly construct your short answer response, you’ll need to know the criteria which fulfills each term. 

Keep it short and sweet. Try to keep your answer length within the lined space you are provided. Chances are, if you’re writing another half page below that, you’ve added a lot of unnecessary information and convoluted your answer.

Read the question carefully. This has been said time and time again and for good reason! Having an insufficient answer because you skipped over a key word in the question will lose you several marks!

NESA provides a glossary of keywords which is great for identifying what your question is asking for. Have a read of it here!

Also keep in mind that there is a good chance that some portion of your written examinations will cover content from your practical investigations as well as secondary source investigations!

For an overview of Organisation of Living Things, check out this link for a guide to Year 11 Biology: Module 2!

Organisation of Cells

Inquiry question 1: How are cells arranged in a multicellular organism?

Question 1

Which of the following cellular structures contains the genetic material of a cell? (1 mark)

a) Cytoplasm

b) Vacuole

c) Nucleus

d) Lysosome

 

(Compare the differences between unicellular, colonial and multicellular organisms by: 

– investigating structures at the level of the cell and organelle

– relating structure of cells and cell specialisation to function)

Question 2

Which of the following is not a function of the nervous system? (1 mark)

a) Collect sensory input from external environment

b) Initiate responses to a stimulus

c) Maintain homeostasis

d) Provide nutrients to the muscles

 

(Investigate the structure and function of tissues, organs and systems and relate those functions to cell differentiation and specialisation).

Question 3

Which of the following lists the correct hierarchical sequence of structures in terms of increasing complexity? (1 mark)

a) Organisms, cells, tissues, organelles, systems, organs

b) Organelles, cells, tissues, organs, systems, organisms

c) Cells, tissues, organs, organisms, systems, organelles

d) None of the above

 

(Justify the hierarchical structural organisation of organelles, cells, tissues, organs, systems and organisms).

Question 4

Outline a reason why individual units such as bacteria form colonies. (1 mark)

 

(Compare the differences between unicellular, colonial and multicellular organisms by: 

– investigating structures at the level of the cell and organelle

– relating structure of cells and cell specialisation to function).

Question 5

Describe the main functions of muscle tissue in the human body. (3 marks)

 

(Investigate the structure and function of tissues, organs and systems and relate those functions to cell differentiation and specialisation).

Question 6

Compare the structural differences between the  rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum and outline how these differences affect their function. (5 marks)

 

(Compare the differences between unicellular, colonial and multicellular organisms by: 

– investigating structures at the level of the cell and organelle

– relating structure of cells and cell specialisation to function).

Nutrient and Gas Requirements

Inquiry question 2: What is the difference in nutrient and gas requirements between autotrophs and heterotrophs?

Question 7

Which structures are responsible for the majority of movement of material in plants? (1 mark)

a) Xylem and leaves

b) Phloem and leaves

c) Xylem and Phloem

d) Phloem and roots

 

(Investigate the structure of autotrophs through the examination of a variety of materials, for example, dissected plant materials).

Question 8

Which of the following equations correctly models photosynthesis? (1 mark)

a) Carbon dioxide + Water → Glucose + Oxygen

b) Glucose + Oxygen → Carbon dioxide + Water

c) Carbon dioxide + Oxygen → Glucose + Water

d) None of the above

 

(Investigate the function of structures in a plant, including but not limited to: 

– tracing the development and movement of the products of photosynthesis).

Question 9

In the mammalian digestive system, at which point does chemical digestion begin? (1 mark)

a) Large intestine

b) Stomach

c) Oral cavity

d) Small intestine

 

(Trace the digestion of foods in a mammalian digestive system, including: 

– physical digestion

– chemical digestion

– absorption of nutrients, minerals and water

– elimination of solid waste).

Question 10

In the following table, list the nutrient requirements of autotrophs and heterotrophs. (4 marks)

(Compare the nutrient and gas requirements of autotrophs and heterotrophs).

Question 11

A scientist is presented with the fossilised remains of an animal. He/she concluded that the organism was an omnivore, based on the identification of canine, incisor and molar teeth in the skull. 

a) Outline the role of each tooth type in the breakdown of food. (3 marks)

b) Explain how the identification of these features led him/her to that conclusion. (3 marks)

 

(Trace the digestion of foods in a mammalian digestive system, including: 

– physical digestion 

– chemical digestion 

– absorption of nutrients, minerals and water 

– elimination of solid waste).

Question 12

Describe how chemical digestion in the oral cavity assists the breakdown of food in mammals. (2 marks)

 

(Trace the digestion of foods in a mammalian digestive system, including: 

– physical digestion 

– chemical digestion 

– absorption of nutrients, minerals and water 

– elimination of solid waste).

Question 13

Living cells require oxygen.

a) Outline why this is. (2 marks)

b) Explain why the removal of carbon dioxide from living cells is necessary. (3 marks)

 

(Investigate the gas exchange structures in animals and plants through the collection of primary and secondary data and information, for example: 

– microscopic structures: alveoli in mammals and leaf structure in plants 

– macroscopic structures: respiratory systems in a range of animals).

Transport

Inquiry question 3: How does the composition of the transport medium change as it moves around an organism?

Question 14

What type of blood vessel carries blood away from the heart? (1 mark) 

a) Arteries

b) Veins

c) Capillaries

d) All of the above

 

(Investigate transport systems in animals and plants by comparing structures and components using physical and digital models, including but not limited to: 

– macroscopic structures in plants and animals

– microscopic samples of blood, the cardiovascular system and plant vascular systems).

Question 15

Which of the following processes provides the basic mechanism of gas exchange in animals? (1 mark) 

a) Osmosis

b) Diffusion

c) Active transport

d) Facilitated diffusion

 

(Investigate the exchange of gases between the internal and external environments of plants and animals).

Question 16

Which of the descriptions most accurately describe a closed cardiovascular system? (1 mark) 

a) The blood is always enclosed by vessels.

b) The blood is pumped into an open cavity.

c) Blood pressure in this system is low.

d) Best suited for organisms with slow metabolism.

 

(Compare the structures and function of transport systems in animals and plants, including but not limited to:

– vascular systems in plants and animals

– open and closed transport systems in animals).

Question 17

Describe the transport system in flowering plants used to move:

a) Water and minerals from the roots to the leaves. (2 marks)

b) Products of photosynthesis from the leaves to other cells in the plant. (2 marks)

 

(Investigate transport systems in animals and plants by comparing structures and components using physical and digital models, including but not limited to: 

– macroscopic structures in plants and animals

– microscopic samples of blood, the cardiovascular system and plant vascular systems).

Question 18

Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of having an open cardiovascular system compared to a closed one. (5 marks)

 

(Compare the structures and function of transport systems in animals and plants, including but not limited to: 

– vascular systems in plants and animals 

– open and closed transport systems in animals).

Question 19

As blood moves around the body its chemical composition changes. Explain why the composition of oxygen in the blood varies between the following locations:

a) Pulmonary vein and Pulmonary artery. (2 marks)

b) Aorta and Right atrium. (2 marks)

 

(Compare the changes in the composition of the transport medium as it moves around an organism).

Question 20

Describe the current theories which explain the process of moving material through xylem and phloem tissue. (4 marks)

 

(Compare the structures and function of transport systems in animals and plants, including but not limited to: 

– vascular systems in plants and animals 

– open and closed transport systems in animals).

And that wraps up our Year 11 Biology Module 2 practice questions for Organisation of Living Things! Good luck!

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Alex Gao is an Art of Smart mentor and blogger who is passionate about teaching students the skills and know-how of high school. Alex has a great interest in the field of Biology, avidly blogging about the topic whilst also aspiring to become a Biomedical Engineer. Alex graduated in 2018 and was listed on the Distinguished Achievers list for Advanced English, Extension 1 English and Biology.