You now know all the facts and stats about the Bachelor of Economics at UNSW. If you don’t, have a quick look here.  

But, are you still curious about how people feel about this degree? Wonder no more! 

We chatted with Jess, a Bachelor of Economics and Law student at UNSW, about what this degree is really like to study. Have a look! 

Why should you study an Economics degree at UNSW?
Top 3 Pros of an Economics Degree
Top 3 Cons of an Economics Degree
Mistakes You Shouldn’t Make
Things to Know Before Starting UNSW Economics
What Makes this Degree Different
Motivations for Studying UNSW Economics
Potential Career Paths

Why should you study an Economics degree at UNSW?

There are many different reasons to study a Bachelor of Economics at UNSW, from the quality teaching staff to the range of experiences you’ll have at UNSW! Jess tells us a bit about why she decided to study Economics as part of a double degree with Law at UNSW:

Bachelor of Economics UNSW - Student Quote

As we’ve learnt from Jess, UNSW’s Economics degree is extremely flexible for those who want to open themselves to other opportunities in different industries. Students will develop and further hone in on skills such as critical and analytical thinking — skills that can be used not only inside the classroom or office, but in all aspects of life. 

Top 3 Pros of an Economics degree

#1: The Passionate Staff 

The teachers and lecturers of units really make or break a class — if your tutor is bored and uninspired with teaching, not much good will come from you either. Luckily, if you study a Bachelor of Economics at UNSW, the teachers are passionate and accommodating, so you’ll feel more motivated! 

“The teaching team works very closely. Even with the large volume of students asking for help, the experienced team is helpful, down to earth and easy to approach! They collaborate with students and also accommodate different learning styles,” Jess reveals. 

#2: The Support Offered to Each Student 

There is a program offered by UNSW, PASS (Peer Assisted Study Sessions), run by fellow students and are designed to help students fill in the gaps and gain the knowledge they require! PASS is readily accessible and will help you over the line.

PASS involves classes held in addition to lectures and tutorials. They are run on specific concepts and theories learned in class. Each Economics student will get a link to join this class in their email and can optionally join,” Jess tells us. 

#3: Fun and Innovative Teaching Styles 

There are many different ways to learn and the teachers at UNSW embrace this, but this is also extended to the way students are assessed. There is a large workload, but students will have a lot of fun with the many innovative ways the can learn and be examined.

Jess tells us about Playconomics — one way you can be assessed: “You have to build your own bedroom in this little town, you set the prices and work out the economy. This gives you a more practical application of all of the theoretical models that have been learned and implemented in a fun and different way!” 

Top 3 Cons of an Economics Degree

#1: Large Workload 

Due to the fact that the Bachelor of Economics at UNSW covers an extensive range of content, students will have a big workload! However, it should be remembered that staying on track and seeking help when needed can be a lifesaver — PASS will be also there for you.

#2: The Fast Paced Teaching Style

UNSW’s academic year consists of trimesters, meaning that there are three main teaching periods that only last 10 weeks. So, the content is taught at a seemingly accelerated pace!

However, even though the heavy content is taught at a faster pace than other universities, trimesters give students the opportunity to complete their degrees earlier. You should also remember that you can always ask for help if you’re struggling to keep up with the pace.

“If you’re having any trouble or have any questions at all, your tutors are valuable and reliable,” Jess says. 

#3: Lots of Time on Campus 

Jess says, “The teaching format is a lecture and tutorial for each unit, and each class tends to go for an hours and a half!” Though, something to keep in mind is that some units will have more than just one lecture, so this degree can be time consuming.

UNSW Economics will have students on campus for around 12+ hours each week and the nature of this degree is very collaborative, meaning that you’ll have lots of work to complete with group members on campus. While it can be annoying to spend a lot of time on campus, you can take this extra time to become the envy of your friends from other courses and find the best eats on campus.

Mistakes You Shouldn’t Make

It’s only normal to have expectations about what university life will be like, but they don’t always meet reality. Jess tells us a little about her experience with this.

“I think that an expectation that was different for me at least was that a lot of people who study HSC Economics think that it’s just going to be an extension of that — a lot of first-years make the mistake of thinking it would be the same. It’s quite theoretical but I think the degree at UNSW makes it as practical as possible. That’s something that a lot of people don’t know and they aren’t huge fans of Economics degrees as they think that it’ll be more theoretical — very arbitrary, archaic,” Jess says. 

What You Should Know Before Starting UNSW Economics 

Economics is not “niche” or boring! For too long, Economics has had a stigma surrounding it that has kept people from taking on the degree.

“This degree is so linked to what’s happening around us. Lots of people when they hear about Economics think, ‘Oh, that’s so niche’ or ‘That’s so technical…boring!’ But it’s not! It’s very proactive and relevant to our world around us! It’s a very social degree closely linked to the behaviour of people and rationality,” Jess tells us. 

What makes this degree different from the ones offered at other universities? 

“I think UNSW does a great job of reflecting what’s happening at the moment and the practicality of the degree — this is why I was attracted to the UNSW degree instead of the USYD one. I’m not really in the position to speak on the USYD degree but I’m pretty sure it’s run through the Arts faculty. The trimester system at UNSW makes it feel more fast-paced,” Jess tells us. 

What inspired you to choose this degree?

There are many different reasons for studying a Bachelor of Economics at UNSW. Career, prestige, teaching style and many other aspects can be factors or motivations for the study of this degree at UNSW.

“One of the main things I really like about this degree, and Economics as a subject area, is that it is something so practical and related to what’s happening around us in the real world, it’s based on the behaviour and actions of people and equally it has a focus on theory, numbers and maths,” Jess says. 

What are the possible career paths?

UNSW Economics - Careers

The Bachelor of Economics at UNSW allows students to pursue an extensive amount of career paths. These include:

    • Economic Forecaster
    • Graduate Economist
    • Management Consultant
    • Policy Adviser
    • Statistical Analyst
    • Superannuation Adviser
    • Related careers in accounting, finance, human resource management, information systems, marketing and taxation

Matilda Elliott is a Content Writer at Art of Smart and a Communication graduate with a major in Journalism at Western Sydney University. You can find some of her published work in a range of platforms including SBS World News, The Music Network and within her own creative exploits with her twin sister. Matilda is a lover of listening, helping people to tell their stories, making genuine connections, clowning around in her circus troupe and dancing like no one is watching at live music shows!