BlogEnglishTop 50 Quotes You Need for Your Essay from Lord of the Flies

Top 50 Quotes You Need for Your Essay from Lord of the Flies

Island - Lord of the Flies Quotes Featured Image

Got an essay to write on Lord of the Flies, but aren’t sure which quotes you should analyse from the text?

We’ve made your task a little simpler with our list of 50 quotes and 4 different themes explored in Lord of the Flies! You’ll also be able to download a list of these quotes to have on hand.

What are you waiting for? Get scrolling to read through our list of quotes from Lord of the Flies!

Civilisation VS Savagery
Innocence
Humanity’s Inherent Evil
Identity

Civilisation VS Savagery 

Fire representing savagery

#1: “Within the irregular arc of coral the lagoon was still as a mountain lake—blue of all shades and shadowy green and purple.”

  • Chapter 1
  • Techniques: Simile, recurring motif, circular imagery, biblical allusion

#2: “The creature was a party of boys, marching approximately in step in two parallel lines and dressed in strangely eccentric clothing.” 

  • Chapter 1
  • Characters: Stranded boys 
  • Techniques: Foreshadowing, alliteration, ominous imagery 

#3: “This last piece of shop brought sniggers from the choir, who perched like black birds on the criss-cross trunks and examined Ralph with interest.”

  • Chapter 1
  • Characters: The choir, Ralph
  • Techniques: Simile, ominous imagery, foreshadowing

#4: “I agree with Ralph. We’ve got to have rules and obey them. After all, we’re not savages. We’re English, and the English are best at everything. So we’ve got to do the right things.”

  • Chapter 2
  • Characters: Jack (speaker) 
  • Techniques: Foreshadowing, irony, first person plural, short syntax 

#5: “Then, amid the roar of bees in the afternoon sunlight, Simon found for [the littluns] the fruit they could not reach, pulled off the choicest from up in the foliage, passed them back down to the endless, outstretched hands.”

  • Chapter 3
  • Characters: Simon, littluns
  • Techniques: Hyperbolic language, natural imagery, character foil

#6: “Roger gathered a handful of stones and began to throw them. Yet there was a space round Henry, perhaps six yards in diameter, into which he dare not throw. Here, invisible yet strong, was the taboo of the old life. Round the squatting child was the protection of parents and school and policemen and the law.”

  • Chapter 4
  • Characters: Roger, Henry 
  • Techniques: Polysyndeton, foreshadows Rogers killings later in the text

#7: “Kill the pig. Cut her throat. Spill her blood.”

  • Chapter 4
  • Characters: Hunters
  • Techniques: Repetition, parataxis, incantatory tone

#8: “Bollocks to the rules! We’re strong—we hunt! If there’s a beast, we’ll hunt it down! We’ll close in and beat and beat and beat—!”

  • Chapter 5
  • Characters: Jack (speaker)
  • Techniques: Repetition, emphatic language, call to action

#9: “Maybe there is a beast… Maybe it’s only us.”

  • Chapter 5
  • Characters: Simon (speaker), assembly of boys
  • Techniques: Repetition, dialogue, reflective and speculative tone, paradox

#10: “We’re all drifting and things are going rotten. At home there was always a grownup. Please, sir; please, miss; and then you got an answer. How I wish!”

  • Chapter 5
  • Characters: Ralph
  • Techniques: Repetition, exclamatory remark

#11: “The world, that understandable and lawful world, was slipping away.”

  • Chapter 5
  • Characters: Ralph
  • Techniques: Repetition, reflective tone

#12: “Ralph took the conch from where it lay on the polished seat and held it to his lips; but then he hesitated and did not blow. He held the shell up instead and showed it to them and they understood.”

  • Chapter 6
  • Characters: Ralph
  • Techniques: Conch motif, deliberate vagueness

#13: “He opened his eyes quickly and there was the head grinning amusedly in the strange daylight, ignoring the flies, the spilled guts, even ignoring the indignity of being spiked on a stick.”

  • Chapter 8
  • Character: Simon 
  • Techniques: Personification, repetition, symbolism

#14: “This head is for the beast. It’s a gift.”

  • Chapter 8
  • Characters: Jake 
  • Techniques: Symbolism, juxtaposition 

#15: “You knew, didn’t you? I’m part of you? Close, close, close! I’m the reason why it’s no go? Why things are what they are?”

  • Chapter 8
  • Characters: Lord of the Flies, Simon
  • Techniques: Rhetorical questions, epizeuxis, exclamatory remark, intentional vagueness

#16: “A circling movement developed and a chant. While Roger mimed the terror of the pig, the littluns ran and jumped on the outside of the circle.”

  • Chapter 9
  • Characters: Hunters
  • Techniques: Circular imagery, recurring motif, symbolism 

#17: “The mouth of the new circle crunched and screamed” 

  • Chapter 9
  • Characters: Hunters
  • Techniques: Personification, circular imagery, recurring motif

#18: “Piggy and Ralph, under the threat of the sky, found themselves eager to take a place in this demented but partly secure society. They were glad to touch the brown backs of the fence that hemmed in the terror and made it governable.”

  • Chapter 9
  • Characters: Ralph, Piggy, the Hunters 
  • Techniques: Pathetic fallacy, climax, personification

#19: “The chief was sitting there, naked to the waist, his face blocked out in white and red. The tribe lay in a semicircle before him.” 

  • Chapter 10
  • Characters: Jack 
  • Techniques: Circular imagery, recurring motif

#20: “But they’ll be painted! You know how it is.”

The others nodded. They understood only too well the liberation into savagery that the concealing paint brought. 

  • Chapter 11
  • Characters: Eric (speaker), Ralph, Piggy, Sam
  • Technique: Emphatic language, dialogue

#21: “The rock struck Piggy a glancing blow from chin to knee; the conch exploded into a thousand white fragments and ceased to exist … Piggy fell forty feet and landed on his back across the square red rock in the sea. His head opened and stuff came out and turned red. Piggy’s arms and legs twitched a bit, like a pig’s after it has been killed.”

  • Chapter 11
  • Characters: Piggy 
  • Techniques: Simile, symbolism, anticlimax

#22: “Then the sea breathed out again in a long slow sigh,  the  water  boiled  white  and  pink  over  the  rock;  and  when  it  went,  sucking  back again,  the body  of  Piggy  was gone.”

  • Chapter 11
  • Characters: Piggy 
  • Techniques: Personification, natural imagery, sibilance

#23: “He swung to the right, running desperately fast, with the heat beating on his left side and the fire racing forward like a tide.”

  • Chapter 12
  • Characters: Ralph 
  • Techniques: Simile, recurring fire motif, juxtaposition

#24: “Ralph launched himself like a cat; stabbed, snarling, with the spear, and the savage doubled up.”

  • Chapter 12
  • Characters: Ralph 
  • Techniques: Simile, sibilance, feline imagery 

Innocence

Innocence with marbles

#25: “Then, with the martyred expression of a parent who has to keep up with the senseless ebullience of the children, he picked up the conch, turned toward the forest, and began to pick his way over the tumbled scar.”

  • Chapter 2
  • Characters: Piggy 
  • Techniques: Metaphor, motif of the conch, symbolism of the island’s scar 

#26: “Apart from food and sleep, they found time for play, aimless and trivial, in the white sand by the bright water. They cried for their mothers much less often than might have been expected; they were very brown, and filthily dirty.”

  • Chapter 4
  • Characters: The littluns 
  • Techniques: Diction, third-person omniscient narrator, juxtaposing adjective use

#27: “A spring had been tapped, far beyond the reach of authority or even physical intimidation. The crying went on, breath after breath, and seemed to sustain him upright as if he were nailed to it.”

  • Chapter 5
  • Characters: Percival
  • Techniques: Metaphor, biblical allusion, repetition

#28: “Even the sounds of nightmare from the other shelters no longer reached him, for he was back to where came from, feeding the ponies with sugar over the garden wall.”

  • Chapter 6
  • Characters: Ralph 
  • Techniques: Domesticated imagery of a pony, juxtaposition, dreamscape

#29: “A semicircle of little boys, their bodies streaked with colored clay, sharp sticks in their hands, were standing on the beach making no noise at all.”

  • Chapter 12
  • Characters: The hunters, Ralph 
  • Techniques: Circular imagery, sibilance

#30: “A little boy who wore the remains of an extraordinary black cap on his red hair and who carried the remains of a pair of spectacles at his waist, started forward, then changed his mind and stood still.”

  • Chapter 12
  • Characters: Jack
  • Techniques: Intentional omittance of name, motif of the spectacles

#31: “And in the middle of them, with filthy body, matted hair, and unwiped nose, Ralph wept for the end of innocence, the darkness of man’s heart, and the fall through the air of the true, wise friend called Piggy.” 

  • Chapter 12
  • Characters: Ralph
  • Techniques: Listing, evocative adjectives, juxtaposition

Humanity’s Inherent Evil 

Dark trees representing evil - Lord of the Flies quotes

#32: “The ground beneath them was a bank covered with sparse grass, torn everywhere by the upheavals of fallen trees, scattered with decaying coconuts and palm saplings. Behind this was the darkness of the forest proper and the open space of the scar.”

  • Chapter 1
  • Characters: Ralph, Piggy 
  • Techniques: Sibilance, descriptive imagery, contrast between images of decay (coconuts) and growth (saplings)

#33: “This time Ralph expressed the intensity of his emotion by pretending to knock Simon down; and soon they were a happy, heaving pile in the under-dusk.”

  • Chapter 1
  • Characters: Ralph, Simon, Jack
  • Techniques: Alliteration, foreshadowing of Simon’s death, juxtaposition

#34: “Here was a coral island. Protected from the sun, ignoring Piggy’s ill-omened talk, he dreamed pleasantly.”

  • Chapter 1
  • Characters: Ralph, Piggy
  • Techniques: Biblical allusion

#35: “The pile was so rotten, and now so tinder-dry, that whole limbs yielded passionately to the yellow flames that poured upwards and shook a great beard of flame twenty feet in the air”

  • Chapter 2
  • Techniques: Personification of the fire, foreshadowing

#36: “He began to dance and his laughter became a bloodthirsty snarling.” 

  • Chapter 4
  • Characters: Jack 
  • Techniques: Contrast, canine imagery

#37: “His mind was crowded with memories; memories of the knowledge that had come to them when they closed in on the struggling pig, knowledge that they had outwitted a living thing, imposed their will upon it, taken away its life like a long satisfying drink.”

  • Chapter 4
  • Characters: Jack
  • Techniques: Simile, third-person omniscient narrator, anadiplosis

#38: “I know there isn’t no beast—not with claws and all that, I mean—but I know there isn’t no fear, either…Unless we get frightened of people.” 

  • Chapter 5
  • Characters: Piggy
  • Techniques: Foreshadowing ensuing savagery, incorrect grammar, Piggy as a symbol for pragmatism 

#39: “Simon found he was looking into a vast mouth. There was blackness within, a blackness that spread.”

  • Chapter 8
  • Characters: Simon 
  • Techniques: Repetition, symbolism, personification 

#40: “Which is better–to have laws and agree, or to hunt and kill?”

  • Chapter 11
  • Characters: Piggy (speaker), Hunters 
  • Techniques:  Question, repetition, diction, contrast

#41: “Her bows [were] hauled up and held by two ratings. In the stern-sheets another rating held a sub-machine gun.” 

  • Chapter 12
  • Characters: Naval officers
  • Techniques: Female pronoun, military jargon, recurring motif of violence 

Identity 

Open vintage ancient book. Pattern background for design. The book on a round oak wooden table and green wall background.

#42: “They used to call me Piggy!”

  • Chapter 1
  • Characters: Piggy (speaker), Ralph 
  • Techniques: Emphatic language, dialogue, use of insults

#43: “I could swim when I was five. Daddy taught me. He’s a commander in the Navy. When he gets leave he’ll come and rescue us. What’s your father?” 

  • Chapter 1
  • Characters: Ralph (speaker), Piggy 
  • Techniques: Question, boasting tone, short syntactical form 

#44: “You could see now that he might make a boxer, as far as width and heaviness of shoulders went, but there was a mildness about his mouth and eyes that proclaimed no devil.”

  • Chapter 1
  • Characters: Piggy
  • Techniques: Metaphor, biblical allusion, third-person omniscient narrator

#45: “The smaller boys were known by the generic title of “littluns.”

  • Chapter 3
  • Techniques: Metonymy

#46: “The mask was a thing on it’s own, behind which Jack hid, liberated from shame and self-consciousness.”

  • Chapter 4
  • Characters: Jack 
  • Technique: Symbolism of the mask, sibilance, juxtaposition of hiding and being liberated

#47: “Jack planned his new face. He made one cheek and one eye-socket white, then he rubbed red over the other half of his face and slashed a black bar of charcoal across from right ear to left jaw.”

  • Chapter 4
  • Characters: Jack 
  • Techniques: Symbolism, diction choice (volatility of word slashed)

#48: “What are we? Humans? Or animals? Or savages? What’s grownups going to think?”

  • Chapter 5
  • Characters: Piggy 
  • Techniques: Hypothetical questions, anaphora, incorrect grammar 

#49: “Percival Wemys Madison, The Vicarage, Harcourt St. Anthony, Hants, telephone, telephone, tele-“

  • Chapter 5
  • Characters: Percival 
  • Techniques: Listing, repetition, incantatory tone, disrupted syntax

#50: “I’m chief,” said Ralph, “because you chose me. And we were going to keep the fire going. Now you run after food—”

  • Chapter 9
  • Characters: Ralph (speaker), Jack
  • Techniques: Assertive language, dialogue, disrupted sentence, symbolism 

#51 (bonus!): “Someone was throwing stones: Roger was dropping them, his one hand still on the lever. Below him, Ralph was a shock of hair and Piggy a bag of fat.”

  • Chapter 11
  • Characters: Roger, Ralph, Piggy
  • Techniques: Metaphor, religious imagery, hyperbole

Download our list of Lord of the Flies quotes now!

On the hunt for quotes from other texts?

Check out our list of quotes for the following texts:

Are you looking for some extra help with your analysis of Lord of the Flies quotes?

We have an incredible team of English tutors and mentors!

We can help you master your analysis of Lord of the Flies by taking you through the summary, key characters, quotes and themes. We’ll also help you ace your upcoming English assessments with personalised lessons conducted one-on-one in your home, online or at one of our state of the art campuses in Hornsby or the Hills!

We’ve supported over 8,000 students over the last 11 years, and on average our students score mark improvements of over 20%!

To find out more and get started with an inspirational English tutor and mentor, get in touch today or give us a ring on 1300 267 888!


Jessica Arentz is a Content Writer at Art of Smart and an undergraduate student at the University of Sydney where she studies a Bachelor of Arts/Advanced Studies (Media and Communications) (Marketing). She currently volunteers at 2SER community radio station as a producer and newsroom reader. When not writing, you can find Jess searching the web for cheap flights or spending her days with her head buried deep in a book.

45,861 students have a head start...

Get exclusive study content & advice from our team of experts delivered weekly to your inbox!

AOS Website Asset 2

Looking for English Support?

Discover how we can help you!

AOS Website Asset 1